2015 Great Stew 15K Race Report

Speaking of historical races, there’s also the Great Stew 15K in Lynn with it’s 41st year in action! Yes, that’s right before I was running very sick and weak (for me) half marathons, I had a great showing at a 15K.

The 2015 Great Stew 15K was originally scheduled in Mid-February as it usually is. Being New England, we always expect cold, wind and general crap weather. What we didn’t expect was 100 inches of snow that were beyond most humble cities’ ability to remove with many more inches in the near future. So the race director did what many others tried and rescheduled for data that would allow a city to recovery a bit, clear up it’s roads and recruit more volunteers!

And that is how we found ourselves on Sunday March 8th with a race at 10AM.

The race is only $15 and $20 on race day, so a great local option for those on a budget. There’s no medals, and there’s no race shirts, the roads are not closed, but there’s a dedicated race director, and an amazing group of volunteers making it a great event. There’s also Stew at the end, but I’ll get back to that.

Race morning I woke up and felt the usual lazy Sunday feeling I’ve grown accustomed to this winter. I wasn’t sure if the race was going to go on or not, so I ran a tempo 10 miler Friday and did a snowshoe walk Saturday.

As I was making my way through my Costco size jar of peanut butter for breakfast, my friend Dan stopped by to pick me and another friend to the race. And that was that for breakfast… I should really get back to a routine.

We got there an hour early to make sure there was parking. As promised, there was a warm place to hang out before the race start at the Knights of Columbus in Lynn and real bathrooms. Nothing is better than real bathrooms before a race with minimal lines. Not sure where the other people went.

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As Dan went to warm up for the race, Sonia and I stay back as I covered by the heater. Eventually it was 3 minutes to start of the race and I decided now would be a good idea to hobble over.

As the race started, I kept a moderately conservative pace. I heard the race was hilly and I wasn’t sure what to expect.

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The weather was in the 30s and although I expected to be way too warm in a long sleeve, I decided to run with it and in actually ended up never really warming up. The wind and overcast clouds did not make it feel any more like March!

The race starts on a side street and continues to on a relatively busy road. While there’s power in number of runners around you, I didn’t feel save enough to wear my headphones so I just carried them I guess for decoration. The hills many mentioned were nowhere as bad as Amherst and the only really lung killer for me was around the 4-5 mile mark.

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I really have no idea what I’m thinking here, maybe gee I’m thirsty but I’m too cold to drink water.  Or better yet, I was feeling the joy of the downhill portion.

Towards the last 3rd of the race (it’s only 9.3ish miles) I started to pick up my pace and feeling in a good running spot. I even got to pass a few dudes which always makes me happy!

However in the last mile I started to loss my pace as the mile wouldn’t end! My garmin had me a 9.55 distance versus the 9.3 official distance.  My kick was weaker than I would have liked but I was excited as I sprang through the finish line. For a short moment I regained the joy of running I seem to be struggling with this year!

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And nothing catches you heel handed as these photos demonstrating part of the what’s probably causing my PF!

After the race, I enjoyed some Great Stew as the race name indicates. Although I did put my foot in my mouth as I rambled about not really being a fan of stew and then loving the one they had at the race as I downed two bowls!

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They had a meat and vegetarian option as well as cookies, bananas and hot beverage. I think there was a cash bar too if one wanted to.

There was an awards ceremony afterwards that seemed to be geared more towards the older age groups. They got some small packs and hats I think. It went top 5 in gender as overall winners and then age group winners starting at 40+ going in 5 year increments. So basically the the 1-39 age group and overall winners was one group. I was about a few seconds off from 5th place. If only I didn’t give into the voice for walk breaks up that hill in the middle!

Finish Time 1:08:59

Official Pace 7:25

Division Place – 6/37

Overall Place – 38/173

Overall, for $15 it was a great small race and hope to participate next year!

2015 New Bedford Half Marathon Race Report

As a Boston runner, there’s just certain iconic road races that come to mind. Boston Marathon, of course. Falmouth Road Race…which is pretty much the celebrity running party of the year, and New Bedford Half Marathon. The 38th annual New Bedford Half Marathon was held on March 15th, 2015 at 11AM. Race registration started at $50 and goes up to $70 the week of the race. The race generally sells out and there is no race day registration; however, this year the race director made an exception.

The race calls itself a fast course, but I think that might be because some of the fastest local runners are running it that day as part of the USATF competition, and it’s an optimal Boston marathon prep race.

For a while, many of us wondered will the race go on? As mother nature and global weather change dumped 100+ plus inches on Boston, races were dropping of the schedule one by one… in fact another race that was rescheduled for the same day in NH, was cancelled instead. New England runners have just become accustomed to race day cancellation disappointments. Luckily for me and all the other runners, New Bedford race director, volunteers and the City of New Bedford were fully dedicated to putting on this race! Cancellation was not even a thought that crossed anyone’s mind.

But first the beginning:

Back in January with my eyes full of hopes and dreams, I added New Bedford Half Marathon to my schedule as a goal A race… I really thought that with decent speedwork and dedication, I could focus on a major PR for my half marathon time. Then my plantar fascia drama started and I just tried to hold onto any fitness I have. The snowstorm after snowstorm did not help my training. And because I’m just THAT lucky, a few days before the race I happened to catch my annual cold nightmare of the year. I drank cups and cups of tea, honey, lemon, orange juice and rested hoping to get better by race day.

So there I am on race morning trying to convince myself I’m not sick. It worked for about as long as 8AM when my friend came to pick me up for our drive to New Bedford where I asked if we can do an emergency pharmacy run as I loaded up on more advil, sudafed (already had) and nasal spray before our drive down south. New Bedford is about a 70 minute south of Boston from us and for the most part on that day we hit no traffic going there or coming home. I proceeded to cough medicine myself up to the point of being a zombie.

We got to the New Bedford YMCA where number pick up was really easy. I expected it to get a bit crazy with so many runners, but the race volunteers had multiple tables set up based on race number for pick. The race had strong security but not overwhelming and annoying. They quickly scanned through all bags that would go into the Y and were only allowed in the locker rooms and not the gym part. The locker room was toasty to say the least, but there was a good amount of lockers in there for the girls. We showed up about an hour early as due to snow there was limited parking and we wanted to make sure we had no problems. Got lockers, changed, got bibs and were all set and ready to run. They had many bathroom options from the YMCA indoor to porta ones outside.

10 minutes before the start, Sonia and I left the safe warmness of the Y and walked the two blocks for race start that was already packed with runners. I know the race had pace groups, but it was hard to find as the excitement took over. We took a photo and parted ways.

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At this point, I still had delusions that I could run a decent race, not a PR race, but a decent run. And then the gun went off. Immediately I felt like a cliche in a movie… you know that scene where someone busts their face on the floor and slows down to slow motion… well don’t worry I didn’t fall, but every step from the start felt (and was) in slow motion for me. My limbs and mind just felt fogged as the days of lack of eating and drowsy meds took it’s tool.

Within a mile, I changed my goal from time to just trying to finish. There was the option to drop out, sure… but here’s the deal, I love running races and even when I’m not racing per say, I like finishing. The idea of dropping out just because I knew my time was going to be terrible felt ridiculous to me.  The other things that went through my head was the city and volunteers put a lot of time and effort into clearing the snow off the roads so we could all run, so of course I should take advantage of the offer. And most importantly, this was 13.1 miles, only half the distance of a marathon and if I was ready to drop out, what am I going to do next month when the Boston Marathon comes up? There is not enough time to train and catch up. It’s just not possible for me this year. The only thing I could do is embrace the suck, endure and get it done with. The pain and perseverance is what makes us runners, and ultra runners sign up for things that most people consider crazy. Or maybe it’s the masochism.

The course is quintessential New England. It has rolling hills, crazy winds and a beautiful seaside view. However, unlike many New England small races, the course is closed to traffic. The locals and police were super encouraging! Even when I was half crawling in my walking break, the police would stop traffic to give me priority.

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New Bedford as a town/city has its charms and troubles. There’s lovely old architecture with cobblestones, churches and other signs of how historic the city is. And then there’s the uneven road and giant potholes that turn parts of the race into obstacle courses with fast food chains that can be anywhere middle America.

The course is a single loop from what I can tell and a good chunk of miles are on the ocean side. This helps balance out some of the rolling hills that hit you in the first and last few miles, but it will not serve as much protection from the wind.

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Aid stations were every 2 miles with water, but I didn’t see anything that looked like calories/fuel. I did see a medic table at many of the water stops, so I’m sure if I needed something I could have asked. I didn’t feel hungry (or pretty much any thanks sudafed!) but it would have been smarter had I carried some fuel for this race.

I kept my run walk method where every mile or so I would need to walk to catch my breath… as runners would run by me and pat me on my back telling me I could do this. I must have looked really pathetic? Or runners are just that friendly. It was great to spot many familiar faces from TARC events and other running events! Makes you remember just how small our running community is even in a sea of so many faces!

I don’t know how, but eventually I got to the final 2 miles and I said to myself, there, that wasn’t so bad! Except the final two were on a hill with a headwind! With enough panting and determination, the finish line came in and I pushed my little heart and lungs and stubby legs all the way across.

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I ended up finishing 1:57:12, 27 minutes slower than my January goal and 20 minutes slower than my average half marathon time leaving me completely wiped out for the next two days.

The post race food was pretty neat. The city is known for fishing so the post race fuel included clam chowder and fried fish sandwiches.

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and the race shirt was neat, as green is my favorite color when I’m not wearing pink.

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Overall while I would rate my own performance a C, the race would be an A in my group. It has great swag, post race food (although I would have liked a non-fish option), seltzer! (polar was a sponsor), closed roads with supportive police at intersections, small but big feel (local race with many runners!) and an overall great vibe. Sure, I would like to flatten most of the hills and create a wind barrier from the wind, but then it wouldn’t be a New England race. Plus if history means anything, it’s one of the few races that we can rely to not get cancelled due to weather with full local support! Something that’s getting a little rare lately, (yea looking at you Hampton beach, Hyannis, Salem and all the other canceled races).

Hopefully next year I can run a redemption!

Weekly Recap and an updated MRI results

So I whined and I whined and eventually I went for an MRI to try to figure out what exactly is going on in my heel. And all in all, only thing they found is a very angry inflamed plantar fascia, so I am now officially, one of the many runners plagues with the horror and nightmare that is plantar fasciitis.  I didn’t want to believe it since the pain wasn’t in my arch and was just staying in a very acute place in the heel, but I guess MRIs can’t lie.

Speaking of MRIs, have you ever been in one? It’s one of the most archaic looking devices. It reminds me of what the 1960s thought the future would be like! Now the less, they are pretty cool. Most of the human body is made up of water molecules, which consist of hydrogen and oxygen atoms.. During a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan, you lie in a strong magnetic field and radio-frequency waves are directed at your body. This produces detailed images of the inside of your body. It took about 30 minutes as I tried my best to lie still and not move my foot. It would make these loud beeping sounds, about 5 different kind, and each of these sounds represented different images it took.  It was a pretty cool experience! Yay for health insurance!

Anyway back to the foot…. PF it is and it is one of the most frustrating running issues in the world since once your half it, it can get soo chronic and just refuses to go away! A PF flare is usually the result of tight muscles around the calf. I think when I was cross training on the arch trainer and bike trainer, I let my calves get tighter then I would normally running and when I went back to running, it probably resulted in a flare up. Or as the nasty Physician Assistant lady put it, “an error in my training.”

I know at some point, I will have to take a running break, again! I’m not looking forward to it. In the meantime, I am trying to stretch as much as I can. Foam roll. Ice and cry in pain. Do my toe and calf exercises. Use my little ball thing on my foot and just hope that it magically goes away. If there’s one thing there’s no shortage of on the interwebs it’s PF advice, half of which contradicts the others. Wear more cushion, go barefoot, don’t go barefoot, stretch, don’t stretch.. everyone is full of opinions when it comes to PF… but I prefer to sticking to listening to people’s experiences instead.

Races and running.

I am still running Boston.

It’s going to be very ugly, not as ugly as 2012, but it’ll be a tough race.

I am going to run Wisconsin marathon two weeks later because I’ll be in Chicago for work and the opportunity to get another state is too good to pass up. Speaking of which, come run it with me! Code LIANA15 gets you $5 off either the full or half marathon!

I might be passing on Fargo after a tough decision. Short story is that I applied and got an “elite” entry into the race. It’s not so much elite as probably more complimentary. With that, I was hoping to break 3:15 in a marathon. I have a 1:31 half (unofficial) and on a full flat course, I really believe I have hope of that in me. That was before my PF struggles and 105 inches of snow destroyed the city I am in.

Long story short, while I really hate giving up this entry, and another state, the expenses of flight and lodging might not be worth to run a race in pain. I’ll give myself a bit more time to find a reasonable flight, but if I can’t, it will have to be moved down to another time when I’m running fit again. I know that’s somewhere in my future, I just don’t know if 2015 is it.

So for the most part, I’ve still been running in my attempts to train for Boston. The treadmill running for the most part doesn’t hurt too much, but running outside definitely flares me up more. So maybe more cushion and stretching is the way to go for me? I’m still debating.

Anyway, the on and off weekly recap. Please note the times are faster than my running in the past, because the treadmills I used now versus at my old job are easier and less “inclined” or maybe, my old treadmill was more “inclined.” Either way, less inclinement, faster time.  I use the 3 setting at healthworks and on my home gym, while 2-3 at Planet fitness, but who knows what that even means.

Monday8 Miles, average pace 7:45 was a more eased in run after my 10 mile race on Sunday.

Tuesday10 Miles, first 8 at 7:33 pace, last 2 at 8:45 pace for cool down. I find that adding a few slower miles has really helped when I do my “Faster” runs.

Wednesday – Rest… I got paranoid that I was pushing too hard so I took a rest day

Thursday – 9.2 Miles I ran first 8.15 in an hour, 7:21 pace, and did a cool down 1.05 in about 8:34

Friday – 8 Miles another 7:45 average pace run. I was planning on only running a 10K but then decided to go for 8

Saturday – Rest day, I wasn’t planning on it, but the early 5:30-6Am wake ups caught up to me and I just ended up napping away half the day.

Sunday – 15 miles, average pace around 8:15 which includes walking on icey patches.  My friend invited me with him on his run in Newton on the carriage roads. It’s pretty much that most runnable place in Boston and part of it is along the Boston Marathon course.  It’s about 3.7 miles out and 3.7 miles back. It might go longer, but we (or maybe just me/I) weren’t sure where.  Ran 7:50-55 average pace for about 7.5 miles together and then I took it easier on a second loop alone. Surprised that I was able to run without music, but the company on half the run helped a ton!

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Total Miles – 50 miles and one tight left foot with a fiesty heel from Sunday’s run

 

And I will almost end this post on the fact that every time I type plantar fasciitis, my computer wants to auto-correct it to plantar fascist… which seems to be a more accurate description. Happy thoughts!

Tell me something you’re looking forward to this week? I’m going to a foodie blogger event at Ostra on Tuesday that I’m super hyped up for!